Posts Tagged ‘Aaron Strout’

GeoM, part two

October 6, 2010

2nd session at GeoMThis blog post covers the second of three panel/sessions at GeoM, held at MIT’s NERD Center on Monday. It was hosted by Mike Schneider, SVP Director, Digital Incubator for agency Allen & Gerritsen. For highlights of the 1st panel, click here. Also, these highlight blog posts may be a bit jumpy, because they are comprised of the tweets I made during the sessions.

Session 2: Data and Loyalty
Moderator: Sean Corcoran, analyst at Forrester (@SeanCor)
Panelists: Aaron Strout, CMO, Powered.com (@AaronStrout)
Anne Mai Bertelsen, loyalty and integrated marketing strategy consultant, Mai Strategies (@AnneMai)
Matt Galligan, SimpleGeo Co-founder and CEO (@mg)

Sean Corcoan, Moderator: “Forrester Research shows that Geolocation hasn’t hit huge mass adoption yet, but the growth rate is extremely fast.”

Anne Mai Bertelsen: “Loyalty programs have been around for quite a number of years, so there is precedent for the type of data the geolocation provides. Location data, sentiment data, and spend data can be married to provide new relevant insights for businesses and offers for consumers.”

Matt Galligan: “Police monitor mentions of the word ‘party’ at night on twitter to determine where to station officers; that’s an instance of location data being helpful.”

Aaron Strout: “My experience with some of the companies that are entering into geolocation marketing strategies is that they are not going far enough, fast enough with some of their offers and programs.”

Matt Galligan: “The technology in your pocket is far more advanced than the technology that is checking you out at the store.”

Anne Mai Bertelsen: “For big companies that understand loyalty, social media/geolocation resides in a different department, apart from the rest of the marketing management, which is an impediment to fully realizing the possibilities that geolocation offers.”

Aaron Strout then discusses Augmented Reality, i.e. Yelp’s Monacle feature.

Sean Corcoran, Moderator: “What if Facebook makes a mistake with privacy (and it’s been know to make a few mistakes in privacy) with Facebook Places, will that set geolocation back?”

Anne Mai Bertelsen: “The best traditional loyalty programs require registration and opt-in. Legislators have been watching these loyalty programs for years. People use grocery loyalty because they get value. The expectation in geolocation loyalty programs would be the same to the consumer (i.e. what value am I getting in exchange for checking-in?), although offering up one’s location seems scarier to most consumers.”

Aaron Strout: “Smart companies will set things up so they would get a ping to know when loyal shoppers are in the store. Also, people forget that you can check-in without making it public.”

Anne Mai Bertelsen: “Marketing people don’t mine data well, they just don’t. They aren’t working with good, smart models of loyalty, behavior, and how that translates into sales.”

Matt Galligan: “The geolocation space is already so fragmented, it’s hard for companies to know where to start. At the same time, the geolocation space is starting to get really exciting.”

Earlier in the session, Aaron Strout referenced a case-study of Whole Foods and Trader Joe consumers’ shopping behaviors, and later that link was tweeted. It lives here: Hyper-local traffic measurement and analysis

Me and AaronAfter this session wrapped, it was great to reconnect with Aaron Strout who I met only once in Boston before he relocated to Austin.

Highlights of the 1st panel. Highlights of the 3rd panel. Also, Eric Leist of host A & G has a recap that includes highlights and the blog posts that came out of GeoM.

Social Media Marketing Best Practice: Use multiple media

September 9, 2008

Continuing Mitch Joel’s excellent suggestion to write about social media marketing best practices, today’s post is about the differences in media.

The social media universe now includes many, many types of web sites and media. It’s not just about blogging. Social media includes podcasting, videocasting, networking, photo sharing, instant messaging, and texting. And importantly, it includes dialog in all of these media.

Blogging still figures importantly for a variety of reasons. The written word can be powerful, and importantly, most people can respond and give feedback via a blog, which is not as true for other media. Also, reading the written word is much faster for most people than listening to a podcast or watching a videocast of the same information.

There are some people who are tied to the blogging and the written word. While there may be valid reasons for blogging, a social media marketing campaign will have greater reach and participation if other media are also incorporated. Just as some people prefer to create in a certain media, (written word, audiocast, videocast), people also prefer to “consume” in certain media. And many people consume different media depending on the situation. Some people access the internet in the evenings at home, and enjoy watching video clips. Others like to listen to information on their commute, so prefer audio versions. Yet other folks scan the internet while at work and want information in written form so that they can read and digest the information they are seeking quickly.

Once you have developed your core message, adapt it to the nuances of each of these very different presentation media. Written word, video, and audio media are all different, and each should be utilized properly. After all, we wouldn’t use a TV ads’ audio for a radio commercial– a radio commercial needs to be created knowing that there are no visuals to go with the audio.

For those discovering this meme, and want to learn more, here are other outstanding contributions:

I have been remiss in tagging others to add to this meme. I tag William Azaroff, Aaron Strout, Tim McAlpine, and Trey Reeme.